Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Townlands & Local Placenames of Dromore Parish County Tyrone

 Compiled by T.T. McQuaid

Marked on the Ordinance Survey Maps of Co. Tyrone, sheets 41, 42, 49, 50 & 57.

Tyrone Civil Parishes

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The information contained in this article was compiled from the following sources:

- Ch-2 of ‘Old Dromore’ published 1987 by P. O’Gallachair. Father Paddy Gallagher, Bundoran-born, was the longest serving curate (1963-78), of Dromore Tyrone. He was also Editor of the Clogher Record and for over thirty years Editor of the Donegal Annual. ‘Old Dromore’ is presently out of print. My copy was given to me by Father McAtee, June of 2012, on my return home.

- The “Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland, Parishes of County Tyrone 1, 1821, 1823, 1831-36, North, West and South Tyrone”. “OSM-1834” The number of houses and inhabitants, arable acres, and acres of mountain and bog.

- The Tithe Applotment 1834, Dromore, Tyrone. (Surnames by Townland are given under this WEB link.) Compiled between 1823 and 1837 in order to determine the amount which occupiers of agricultural holdings over one acre should pay in tithes to the Church of Ireland (the main Protestant church and the church established by the State until its dis-establishment in 1871). The number of Holdings/Surnames is given.

- The Census of Ireland, Co. Tyrone 1881; Part I; Area, Houses, and Population; Vol. III, Province of Ulster, No. 9 County of Tyrone; Info from the table comparing the 1841 to 1881 census for Dromore Parish, by townland, including houses and population.

- Hearth Money Rolls of 1666; was levied half yearly by the Sheriff of each county on the basis of lists of the names of householders compiled by local Justices of the Peace. The list of the households required to pay the Hearth Tax became known as the Hearth Money Rolls, which were arranged by county, barony, parish, and townland. The tax was sometimes collected over an area known as a 'walk', which was based on both the town and a large rural area outside the town. This is why you will see multiple townlands, for one enrty. The surname could have been in either townland.

Note 1: On the Ordnance Survey Memoirs and the 1834 Tithe Applotment, acres were “Irish or Plantation acres”, not English statute acres. The Ordnance Survey maps used the English statute acre measurement. The English statute acre is also used on the 1841, and latter, census and the Griffith’s Valuation of 1864. The Irish acre is 1.62 times larger than the English statute acre. The difference between the Irish acre and the statute acre arises from the fact that the Irish mile is 1411 miles (1.273 miles (2.049 km)). Irish Acres X 1.62 = English Standard Acres


“Those who know the value of these ancient names as badges of personal identification will continue to use them, because they have served our people so well for so long, ….. not to mention those who have inherited our rich heritage of familiar placenames.”


Townlands of Dromore Parish County Tyrone.
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Note 2: To the East of Carnny and Tattycor, on the map above, are the townlands of Coyagh, Coyagh Glebe and Drumderg Glebe (Drumderg). The Parish of Donacavey lies in this area on the Parish map above. These townlands, in some form, are listed under the Parish of Dromore on the 1666 Hearth Money Rolls, the 1834 Tithe Applotment, the 1864 Griffith’s Valuation and all of the censuses from 1841 to 1911. They DO NOT appear on the Dromore Townland list of ‘Old Dromore’ published 1987 by P. O’Gallachair the Dromore Townland Map (above). Here lies the difference between the Civil vs Ecclesiastical parish. In his work, HEARTH-MONEY AND SUBSIDY ROLLS : CO. TYRONE (CLOGHER DIOCESE) 1965, P. O’Gallachair states “CO. TYRONE (CLOGHER DIOCESE) It will be noted that some denominations, like the present townlands, are found listed under different parishes in 1666 from where they are today, e.g. p. 256 of record: "Drumderg and Cony" (Coyagh) are listed under Dromore Parish in 1666, but are now in Donaghcavey Parish, for the past century (Cf. McKenna, Parish of Dromore, 1921, pp. 8, 47).” The townlands in the ecclesiastical, Catholic Parishes of the Clogher Diocese, changed in the mid 19th century. They did not under the civil parishes.

Back Ground
One cannot attempt a study of Townland and placenames with out first exploring the term Townland, itself.
A townland or bally (Irish: baile fearainn) is a small geographical division of land used in Ireland. The townland system is of Gaelic origin, pre-dating the Norman invasion, and most have names of Irish Gaelic origin. However, some townland names and boundaries come from Norman manors, plantation divisions, or later creations of the Ordnance Survey.
In Ireland, a townland is the smallest administrative division of land. Whilst the concept of townlands is based on the Gaelic system of land division, it was in the 1600s that they became mapped and defined by the English administration for the purpose of portioning the land for investors or grants. The first official evidence of the existence of this Gaelic land division system can be found in church records from before the 12th century.
The term baile, anglicised as "bally", is the most dominant element used in Irish townland names. Whilst today the term "bally" denotes a town or urban settlement, its precise meaning in ancient Ireland is unclear, as towns had no place in Gaelic social organization. The modern Irish term for a townland is baile fearainn (plural: bailte fearainn). The term fearainn means "land, territory, quarter".
The Normans, despite not having a serious influence on townland names, adapted some of them for their own use, possibly seeing a similarity between the Gaelic baile and the Norman bailey, both of which meant a settlement.
Throughout most of Ulster, townlands were known as "ballyboes" (Irish: baile bó, meaning "cow land" and represented an area of pastoral economic value.
In County Cavan, similar units were called "polls", and in counties Fermangh and Monaghan they were known as "tates" or "taths". In regard to tates, modern townlands with the prefix tat- are confined almost exclusively to the diocese of Clogher (which covers counties Fermanagh, Monaghan, and Clogher barony in County Tyrone), and it cannot be confused with any other Irish word.
In County Tyrone the following hierarchy of land division was used: "ballybetagh" (Irish: baile biataigh, meaning "victualler's place"), "ballyboe", "sessiagh" (Irish: séú cuid, meaning sixth part of a quarter), "gort" and "quarter" (Irish:ceathrú). In County Fermanagh it was: "ballybetagh", "quarter" and "tate". Further sub-divisions in Fermanagh appear to be related to liquid or grain measures such as "gallons", "pottles", and "pints".
In Ulster the ballybetagh was the territorial unit controlled by an Irish sept, typically containing around 16 townlands. Fragmentation of ballybetaghs resulted in units consisting of four, eight, and twelve townlands. One of these fragmented units, the "quarter" (representing a quarter of a ballybetagh), was the universal land denomination recorded in the 1608 survey for County Donegal. In the early 17th century, 20% of the total area of western Ulster was under the control of the church. These "termon" lands consisted likewise of ballybetaghs and ballyboes, but were held by erenaghs instead of sept leaders.
Thomas Larcom, the first director of the Ordnance Survey of Ireland, made a study of the ancient land divisions of Ireland and summarized the traditional hierarchy of land divisions thus:
10 acres - 1 Gneeve; 2 Gneeves - 1 Sessiagh; 3 Sessiaghs - 1 Tate or Ballyboe; 2 Ballyboes - 1 Ploughland, Seisreagh or Carrow; 4 Ploughlands - 1 Ballybetagh, or Townland; 30 Ballybetaghs - Triocha Céad or Barony. The Ordnance Survey maps used the statute acre measurement.
Townlands vary in size from the smallest, of less than an acre (Old Church Yard, Carrickmore, parish of Termonmagurk, County Tyrone).
The ballyboe (a townland unit used in Ulster) was described in 1608 as containing sixty acres of arable land, meadow, and pasture, however this was misleading as the size of townlands under the Gaelic system varied depending upon their quality, situation, and economic potential. This economic potential ranged from the extent of land required to graze cattle to the land required to support several families. The highest density of townland units recorded in Ulster in 1609 corresponds to the areas with the highest land valuations in the 1860s.
It seems that many moorland areas were not divided into townlands until fairly recently. These areas were "formerly shared as a common summer pasturage by the people of a whole parish or barony". The Ordnance Survey for taxation purposes, documented and standardized the boundaries of the more than 60,000 townlands in Ireland. This process often involved dividing or amalgamation of existing townlands, and defining townland boundaries in areas such as mountain or bog land that had previously been outside the townland system.

In the days of the O’Neills, what size was the parish of Dromore? An old survey gives us the boundaries of the civil parish then, the very same as those of today’s Catholic parish:


This parish meereth on ye east with ye towneland of Tonnagh in yt part of ye parish of Donnoghcavagh yt lyeth in the Barony of Omagh & soe goeth southward in a line to Knockneean in the parish of Kilskirry in ye barony aforesaid, & there runeth from thence westward to Shed (Tedd) in the parish of Templemaghery in ye county of Fermanagh, & from thence goeth a line northward to Aghadullagranna, in ye parish of Dromragh in the Barony of Omagh, & from thence runeth a lyne eastward to Tattemony in yt part of ye parish of Donaghcavagh yt lyeth in the sd. Barony & from thence runeth a lyne northward yt closeth with the towneland of Tonnagh aforesaid, out of this sd. parish runeth ye river of Gouland wch had formerly a bridge over it, but now borne away. There being also a church in ye sd parish wch was ye parish church.

At the time, the parish of Dromore had two “ballybetaghs” or estates. One “Ballinegranaghie” in the townland of Cranny. The other, “Ballinegallvolly”, the Irish form Baile na nGall-bhaili’: The ballibetagh of the foreign homesteads survives in the townlands of Galbally and NewPark. Remains can be found today in the crannóg (man made island) on Goalbally Lough and two ringed forts. The ring-forts of the western part of the parish are present today. One is southeast of Galbally Lough. The other is west in Newpark (formerly Galbally). The “little island” mentioned above is also there. Foreign warriors or troops from the Hebrides and Argyll, brought in by O’Neill, most likely gave name to Galbally. These troops were a standing army to Tir Eoghain. It was Donall O’Neill, King of Tir Eoghain who first introduced these Gail-Gaeil (foreign Irish) and settled them into the territories. Many families of these tall fighting men were given lands by Irish lords from the mid-thirteenth century on. O’Neill’s gallowglasses were among the most famous of them all-the MacDonnells and their relations, the MacSorleys. These surnames are common in Dromore and Kilskeery parish today.

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Irish gallowglass and kern. Drawing by Albrecht Dürer, 1521.

“Many of the old Irish names have been corrupted with the English Conquest and later with the change here to English speech. Many others have been lost altogether. As a result, it is difficult today to discern the correct meanings of the old Irish placenames. But most of them can be explained by comparing the different spellings of them over the past few centuries. Below an effort is made to do this. First listed are the townland names alphabetically, followed by a rendering of the original Irish forms with the meanings in English. Next, other variant forms, found in the past, are given, including the only other sources to suggest meanings for the placenames. These were the Ordnance Survey Field Namebooks of the 1830’s and the little book by the Tyrone author, P. McAleer, Townland Names of County Tyrone, now out of print, updated, but written in the first decade of the 20th century. Other placenames, in the townland, follow, with the Irish form and the meaning in English.”

The first list of Dromore Parishioners available is of those who paid the hearth tax in 1666. There were fifty-six Dromore taxpayer, when the parish population was only a few hundred at the most. It was a tax of 2 shillings on every hearth and fire-place.
Abbreviations of Sources used are as follows;
AGHADARRAGH
Achadh rach: the field of the oaktree, Same meaning given in OSNB; Aghadorra (1654); Aghdara (1666); and Aughadara (1834).  Ederney Hill (Cnoc an endarnai’): Hill of the ambush.  St. Dympna’s Church stands in this townland.

  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 40; Inhabitants 227; Arable acres 312; bog 60
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 30 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 47 Houses; Inhabitants 255
  • Census 1851: 41 Houses; Inhabitants 212
  • Census 1861: 36 Houses; Inhabitants 165
  • Census 1871: 30 Houses; Inhabitants 143
  • Census 1881: 32 Houses; Inhabitants 150
AGHADULLA
Achadh (na) tulcha: Field of the assembly-hill. Same in TNCT; Aghadulla downa, Aghadulla (1654); Aghactulla (1818); Aughadulla (1834); This most northerly townland in the parish is marked on the O.S. map a Aghadulla (Harper) to distinguish it from its eastern neighbor, Aghadulla (Neville), in the parish of Drumragh. Harper and Neville are just the names of two families that held these townlands in the past. Nearby, in the parish of Drumragh, is the celebrated “Mass rock in the Glen” of Corradinna, frequented in the Penal days.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 1 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 29; Inhabitants 139; Arable acres 300; Mountain 300; bog 40
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: Not listed agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 42 Houses; Inhabitants 259
  • Census 1851: 29 Houses; Inhabitants 189
  • Census 1861: 34 Houses; Inhabitants 191
  • Census 1871: 24Houses; Inhabitants 135
  • Census 1881: 19 Houses; Inhabitants 109

AGHEE
Achad Aoidh (or Aodha): Hugh’s field. Same meaning given in OSNB; in TNCT; Aghy (1654); Aughee (1834), Augher (OSM-1834)
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 10; Inhabitants 60; Arable acres 99; bog 45
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 16 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 111
  • Census 1851: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 99
  • Census 1861: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 96
  • Census 1871: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 70
  • Census 1881: 14 Houses; Inhabitants 83
AGHLISH
Achadh loiscthe: the burnt field; but “eachlaisg, a stable”, OSNB; “Each laisc”, TNCT; Aghlisk (1666); Aughlish(1834); Aghlisk O.S. Maps;  Aghlish and Polfore were described formerly under the common name of Edergould as churchland. (See “Polfore” below).
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths (Aghlish & Drumconnis were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 15; Inhabitants 111; Arable acres 126; bog 6
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 20 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 19 Houses; Inhabitants 122
  • Census 1851: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 52
  • Census 1861: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 45
  • Census 1871: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 50
  • Census 1881: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 45
AUGHNAMOE
Achadh na mbo’: Field of the cattle. Same in OSNB; TNCT; Oughnamo (1666); Aughnamo(1834);  Crockban (Cnoc Ba’n), white hill, on McFarland’s land, beside McGread’s. It was formerly Graham’s, then McQuaid’s, one of whom, “Big Mary”, had twelve fingers and twelve toes!  Poll Mo’r: Big hollow, a field on McGread’s land. “The Moat” is a pass on the hill on the wee road that rises up past E. McCread’s bungalow. (Above names from Mrs. P. McGread, nee’ Mullen, a native of Aghnamoe).  Lakemount is the name of the old Hamilton residence here.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 45; Inhabitants 284; Arable acres 390; bog 60
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 47 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 55 Houses; Inhabitants 311
  • Census 1851: 39 Houses; Inhabitants 214
  • Census 1861: 43 Houses; Inhabitants 215
  • Census 1871: 33 Houses; Inhabitants 162
  • Census 1881: 31 Houses; Inhabitants 168
BODONEY
Both Domhnaigh: The church shelter, or else Both Shodomhnaigh: Sodonach’s hut. First meaning given in OSNB; TNCT; Bodony (1610); Bodony (1654); Bodony (1834); A townland in Kilskeery parish has the same name. Neither it nor this Bodoney has any tradition of a church. But the parish of Bodoney in the Glenelly valley (Derry diocese) in N. Tyrone, has.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 27; Inhabitants 152; Arable acres 180; bog 30
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 22 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 28 Houses; Inhabitants 169
  • Census 1851: 19 Houses; Inhabitants 125
  • Census 1861: 20 Houses; Inhabitants 120
  • Census 1871: 17 Houses; Inhabitants 107
  • Census 1881: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 94
CAMDERRY
Cluain darach: The meadow of the oaktree. It is not “Camdhoire”, the crooked wood, as in OSNB; TNCT; for the older variants show it as Clangory; Clangerie (1610); Clamderry (1654); OSM-1834 Camdry; This indicates that this Camderry was not the “Camerghe” of the famous battle of 1241 (which established the O’Neills as rulers of Ulster), as suggested by Hogan (Onomasticon Goedelicum, 154), but perhaps it is one of the places he noted under “Caimdeirge” )p 140).
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 5; Inhabitants 28; Arable acres 40; bog 20
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 6 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 43
  • Census 1851: 5 Houses; Inhabitants 27
  • Census 1861: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 51
  • Census 1871: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 39
  • Census 1881: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 32
CARNALEA
Carn Na laoch: The burial-mound of the warriors; “Corn a laugh, carn of the calves”, OSNB; “Carn liath (the grey mound) or Carn na laugh, carn of the calves”, TNCT; Cornaleghy (1610); Carnaleagh (1654); Cornalea (1758); Carnalea (1834).
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 25; Inhabitants 88; Arable acres 80; Mountain 50; bog 50
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 33 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 44 Houses; Inhabitants 221
  • Census 1851: 33 Houses; Inhabitants 189
  • Census 1861: 24 Houses; Inhabitants 131
  • Census 1871: 24 Houses; Inhabitants 121
  • Census 1881: 19 Houses; Inhabitants 96
CORBALLY
Corrbhaile: The old homestead. Same form, translated as “old town”, OSNB; TNCT; Corouelly (1610); Corelly (1654); Corvally (1666); Corbally, Corwelly (1758); Corbally (1834);  Corbolly McCaron and Corbolly Hamilton, OSM-1884, McCaron and Hamilton are just the names of families that held sections of this townland in the past. The present day townland of Knocknahorn was part of Corbally prior to 1841.
Corbolly McCaron OSM-1834: Houses 32; Inhabitants 161; Arable acres 197; Mountain 50; bog 60
Corbolly Hamilton OSM-1834: Houses 41; Inhabitants 207; Arable acres 199; Mountain 40; bog 60
Corbolly (total)
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 73; Inhabitants 368; Arable acres 396; Mountain 90; bog 120. (Includes present day townland of Knocknahorn)
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 30 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 40 Houses; Inhabitants 234 (does not include Knocknahorn)
  • Census 1851: 43 Houses; Inhabitants 207 “
  • Census 1861: 33 Houses; Inhabitants 169 “
  • Census 1871: 26 Houses; Inhabitants 114 “
  • Census 1881: 22 Houses; Inhabitants 103 “
CORLAGHDERGAN
Cor leach Deargain: The round hill of the monument of Deargain. It is more apt than “ Cor lacha Deargain, round hill of Dargain’s lough”, OSNB; or “Cor loch Ui’ Deargain, TNCT; Colletargan (1654); Caralatt-Dargan (1666); Corlaghdergan (1758); Curlaghdergan (1795);  Corlaghdergan (1834).“Fartagh” (Fearta), meaning graves. “Owens’s croft”, the former scene of many games and sports here, is the field opposite the O’Neill bungalow, on James O’Neill’s land.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 30; Inhabitants 178; Arable acres 229; bog 50
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 31 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 50 Houses; Inhabitants 254
  • Census 1851: 37 Houses; Inhabitants 189
  • Census 1861: 31 Houses; Inhabitants 146
  • Census 1871: 32 Houses; Inhabitants 158
  • Census 1881: 27 Houses; Inhabitants 148
CORNAMUCK
Cor na muc: The round hill of the pigs. Same in OSNB; TNCT; Cornamuch (1654);  Curnamuck (1834);  “Cornessy” (Currach an easa); the weasel’s marsh, a field in Gallagher’s land.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 16; Inhabitants 89; Arable acres 146; bog 35
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 23 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 22 Houses; Inhabitants 128
  • Census 1851: 22 Houses; Inhabitants 122
  • Census 1861: 21 Houses; Inhabitants 106
  • Census 1871: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 113
  • Census 1881: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 107
CORNAMUCKLAGH
Cor u muclach: Round hill of the pig-race or pig-styes. Same in OSNB; TNCT;
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 20; Inhabitants 133; Arable acres 189; bog 44
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 14 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 17 Houses; Inhabitants 119
  • Census 1851: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 107
  • Census 1861: 14 Houses; Inhabitants 95
  • Census 1871: 12 Houses; Inhabitants 69
  • Census 1881: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 53

CORRAHESKIN
Currach eascaoin: The rough (or uneven) marsh. :Currach tseiscinn, the ridge of the quaw or quagmire”, or “a flat swamp”, OSNB; TNCT; Corryheskum OSM-1834; “Byhy” (Beitheach: place of beech trees) is the name of the neighborhood of the old railway bridge (Byhy Bridge) here. It is marked as “Vehagh” on the 1609 map of escheated counties.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 13; Inhabitants 83; Arable acres 140; bog 100
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 9 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 19Houses; Inhabitants 113
  • Census 1851: 6 Houses; Inhabitants 48
  • Census 1861: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 47
  • Census 1871: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 52
  • Census 1881: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 64
COYAGH See note 2 above.
  • HearthTax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths (Drumderg & Coyagh were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Not listed
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 7 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 55
  • Census 1851: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 50
  • Census 1861: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 35
  • Census 1871: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 39
  • Census 1881: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 41

COYAGH GLEBE See note 2 above.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Not listed
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 6 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 45
  • Census 1851: 6 Houses; Inhabitants 42
  • Census 1861: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 37
  • Census 1871: 6 Houses; Inhabitants 25
  • Census 1881: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 37
CRANNY
CRANNACH: The (literally, “a place of trees”). Same TNCT; but “Crannaidh, arborous”. OSNB; Crany (1654); Crany (1666);  Cranny English, Cranny Scott, and Cranny Slevin, OSM-1884, English, Scott, and Slevin are the names of families that held sections of this townland in the past.
Cranny English OSM-1834: Houses 9; Inhabitants 75; Arable acres 116; bog 11
Cranny Scott OSM-1834: Houses 3; Inhabitants 21; Arable acres 50; bog 4
Cranny Slevin OSM-1834: Houses 6; Inhabitants 34; Arable acres 52; bog 5
Cranny (total)
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths (Cranny & Kieldrum were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 18; Inhabitants 130; Arable acres 218; bog 20
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 13 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 80
  • Census 1851: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 69
  • Census 1861: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 37
  • Census 1871: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 44
  • Census 1881: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 43
CURLEY
Corr-ulach: The uneven hill. But :Cor liath, grey, round hill”, OSNB; TNCT; Corhollagh (1609, 1610); Corgah OSM-1834;
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 16; Inhabitants 90; Arable acres 152; bog 40
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 9 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 82
  • Census 1851: 12 Houses; Inhabitants 76
  • Census 1861: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 81
  • Census 1871: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 65
  • Census 1881: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 40
DERGANY
Deirg-eanach: The red marsh or cut-out bog. OSNB; TNCT; Dirrinagh (1654); Dergnah (1666); Also “Deirgenine, reddish land”, OSNB; This land is divided into Dergany Maguire, on the west and Dergany Neville, on the east, called after two families that held these lands in the past. In the former is the placename, “Crokan:, from Cnoc’an, a little hill, while in the latter is “Edenmore”, from E’adan Mo’r. the big hill-brow (400 ft. high). 
 Dergany Maguire
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 11; Inhabitants 79; Arable acres 85; bog 11
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 10 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 96
  • Census 1851: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 63
  • Census 1861: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 33
  • Census 1871: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 49
  • Census 1881: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 28
Dergany Neville OSM-1834: Houses 8; Inhabitants 42; Arable acres 90; bog 10
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 15 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 62
  • Census 1851: 6 Houses; Inhabitants 34
  • Census 1861: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 52
  • Census 1871: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 21
  • Census 1881: 5 Houses; Inhabitants 39
DERRYNASEER
Doire na saor: The oakwood of the carpenters (or of the freemen). OSNB; TNCT; Dernasier (1834); Derrylawn OSM-1834;  “The Minny Burns” is the local name for the meeting of the wee streams on the edge of this townland to form the Owenreagh River. The name seems to have been Miona-srutha’on, wee streams, till the Scots colonists made it “Minny burns”. It is probably the name of the flatlands here in the past, listed among the Belmore lands of 1758 and 1795, as “Minisrighan….Minisroghan, otherwise Munusrighan”
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 16; Inhabitants 78; Arable acres 101; Mountain 25; bog 15
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 2 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 4 Houses; Inhabitants 37
  • Census 1851: 2 Houses; Inhabitants 19
  • Census 1861: 4 Houses; Inhabitants 20
  • Census 1871: 4 Houses; Inhabitants 27
  • Census 1881: 4 Houses; Inhabitants 21
DOOCROCK
Dubh-chnoc: Blackish hill. Same translated as “black hill”, OSNB; TNCT; Coughrough (1834);  “Sce’arda’n (declivity), the name of a field in front of the old Colton home.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 30; Inhabitants 149; Arable acres 190; Mountain 50; bog 50
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 25 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 34 Houses; Inhabitants 206
  • Census 1851: 29 Houses; Inhabitants 153
  • Census 1861: 28 Houses; Inhabitants 146
  • Census 1871: 25 Houses; Inhabitants 129
  • Census 1881: 22 Houses; Inhabitants 118
DRESSOGUE
Dreaso’g: Place of brambles or briars. Same, translated as “Bramble”, OSNB; TNCT; I have found the form, “Dressoge-morris”, in the early eighteenth century, indicating the name of an early Irish owner (Registry of Deeds, Index vol. 43- Tyrone), It is either “Dresso’g Mhuiris”: Muirir’s brambly land, or “Dreaso’g Ui’ Mhuirgheasa”: O’Morris’s brambly land; Dressoge (1666); Dressog (1834).  “Balanadon:, possibly from Be’al A’tha an du’in: the ford of the fort, the name of the rising ground on Slevin’s land.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths Hearths (Grennan & Dressogue were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 15; Inhabitants 95; Arable acres 234; Mountain 10; bog 180
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 5 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 12 Houses; Inhabitants 83
  • Census 1851: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 51
  • Census 1861: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 47
  • Census 1871: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 42
  • Census 1881: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 47
DROMORE
Druim Mo’r: The great drumlin. Same, translated as “great ridge”, OSNB; TNCT; The top part of the great drumlin is today called “Cross Hill” which is a modern translation of the old Irish Name for it, “Millach na croise”. The hilltop of the cross, often englished to Mullaghnacross.  “The Brae” is the name given locally ti the road up this hill from town. It is straight irish, from the word bri’ a hill. At the foot of the Brae is the last block of houses in town on the Irvinestown Road, marked as John’s St on the O.S. map. Oldtimers remember this block called “Dobson’s Row”, probably from the landlord.  Morgan Park is remembered under another name by old-timers here. It is called “Stonybatter”, allegedly because of the stone-throwing skirmishes that followed the monster meeting in Dromore, on New Year’s Day, 1884.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 94; Inhabitants 417; Arable acres 170; bog 10
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 96 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 117Houses; Inhabitants 551
  • Census 1851: 110 Houses; Inhabitants 581
  • Census 1861: 131 Houses; Inhabitants 579
  • Census 1871: 125 Houses; Inhabitants 641
  • Census 1881: 125Houses; Inhabitants 625
DRUMALLARD
Druim (na) mallacht: Drumlin of the cursings: This name was given to it many centuries ago, but its why and wherefore are now lost; “Drumim mala ard, ridge of the highbrow”, OSNB; TNCT; Dromaraght (1609); Dromarrat (1654); Drumallard (1834); Drummarit OSM-1834;
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 17; Inhabitants 103; Arable acres 74; bog 40
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 14 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 94
  • Census 1851: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 35
  • Census 1861: 6 Houses; Inhabitants 29
  • Census 1871: 4 Houses; Inhabitants 26
  • Census 1881: 3 Houses; Inhabitants 11
DRUMCONNIS
Druim (na) choineasa: The ferret’s ridge. But, “Druim Chonais, Conas’s ridge”, OSNB; “Druim conaidh”, TNCT; Dromconnes (1654); Drumconish (1666).
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths (Aghlish & Drumconnis were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 6; Inhabitants 33; Arable acres 49; bog 20
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 5 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 3 Houses; Inhabitants 18
  • Census 1851: 2 Houses; Inhabitants 11
  • Census 1861: 5 Houses; Inhabitants 22
  • Census 1871: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 40
  • Census 1881: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 47
DRUMDERG See note 2 above. Drumderg (1666)(1834) OMS-1834; Drumderg Glebe (1841-81 census)
  • HearthTax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths (Drumderg & Coyagh were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 22; Inhabitants 139; Arable acres 170; bog 40
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 27 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 33 Houses; Inhabitants 176
  • Census 1851: 23 Houses; Inhabitants 127 Census 1861: 22 Houses; Inhabitants 99
  • Census 1871: 19 Houses; Inhabitants 78
  • Census 1881: 21 Houses; Inhabitants 91
DRUMLISH
Drium loiscthe: The scorched hil-ridge. But, “Druim lis. Ridge of the fort, OSNB; “Druim lois”, TNCT; Dromloise (1609); Drumliske (1654); Drumlish (1666).
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 9; Inhabitants 53; Arable acres 60; Mountain 10; bog 120
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 8 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 93
  • Census 1851: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 76
  • Census 1861: 14 Houses; Inhabitants 68
  • Census 1871: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 67
  • Census 1881: 14 Houses; Inhabitants 74
DRUMSHIEL
Druim Siadhail: Siadhal’s (or Shiel’s) hill-ridge. OSNB; TNCT; Dromsheel (1654); Drumsheal OSM-1934.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 17; Inhabitants 92; Arable acres 113; bog 10
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 10 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 26 Houses; Inhabitants 116
  • Census 1851: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 107
  • Census 1861: 17 Houses; Inhabitants 74
  • Census 1871: 14 Houses; Inhabitants 58
  • Census 1881: 14 Houses; Inhabitants 69
DRUMSKINNY
Druim scine: Hill-ridge of the knife-edge. OSNB; TNCT; Dromskinny (1654); This townland also had four divisions, each named after the families that held it in the past- Crozier, Smith, and Cunningham, from north to south, and Wiley in the southwest. In Drumskinny Crozier, is the hill of Crockroe (Cnoc rua: the red hill). This name recalls an obsolete placename here in 1654, called “Gortroe” (Gor rua) meaning the red, tilled field. The old Dromore Road railway station (1853-1957) stood in Drumskinny Cunningham. Between it and the lake to the east is Togherdoo (To’char dubh: the black pass), which gave its name to Togherdoo Lough and also to Togherdoo Methodist church, which is in Galbally, today.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 1 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 57; Inhabitants 331; Arable acres 365; bog 60
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 42 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 51 Houses; Inhabitants 301
  • Census 1851: 41 Houses; Inhabitants 215
  • Census 1861: 41 Houses; Inhabitants 200
  • Census 1871: 34 Houses; Inhabitants 164
  • Census 1881: 31 Houses; Inhabitants 150
DULLAGHAN
Duilleacha’n: The wee leafy place. But, “Tulcha’n, a small hill”, OSNB; TNCT; Dollahan, Dulian (1654); Dullaghan (1666); Dullahan OSM-1835;  Through this townland and Letteree runs the Abhainn Dubh, englished today to the “Blackwater”.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths (Dullaghan & Letteree were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 32; Inhabitants 188; Arable acres 134; Mountain 266; bog 90
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 39 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 45 Houses; Inhabitants 292
  • Census 1851: 39 Houses; Inhabitants 228
  • Census 1861: 38 Houses; Inhabitants 205
  • Census 1871: 41 Houses; Inhabitants 214
  • Census 1881: 44 Houses; Inhabitants 197
EDENAGON
E’adan nag con: The hill-face of the hunting dogs. Same translated as “brow or brae of the dogs or hounds”, OSNB; TNCT; Eadanegoun (1609); Ednagone ODM-1834;  Annaghavoggy (Eanach’s a’bhogaigh), the marsh of the bog, is in the very western end of the townland.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 7; Inhabitants 31; Arable acres 101; bog 13
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 6 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 64
  • Census 1851: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 43
  • Census 1861: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 48
  • Census 1871: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 51
  • Census 1881: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 37
ESKER
Eiscear: The gravel ridge. And, “Eiscir, a long ridge (of sandhills)”, OSNB; “A low gravelly ridge”, TNCT; Eskare (1609), Esler (1654, 1666). Esker House is the residence of the Parish Priest of Dromore.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths (Esker & Gallbally were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 24; Inhabitants 135; Arable acres 247; bog 80
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 27 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 30 Houses; Inhabitants 180
  • Census 1851: 27 Houses; Inhabitants 137
  • Census 1861: 21 Houses; Inhabitants 95
  • Census 1871: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 81
  • Census 1881: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 89
GALBALLY
Na Gall-bhaili’: The foreigners place. (Foreign warriors or troops from the Hebrides and Argyll brought in by O’Neill most likely gave name to Galbally.) Incorrect to translate as “Gal-bhaile, English town”, OSNB; TNCT; as there were no English here till centuries after it got its name.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths (Esker & Gallbally were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 28; Inhabitants 125; Arable acres 180; bog 50
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 15 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 34 Houses; Inhabitants 172
  • Census 1851: 24 Houses; Inhabitants 111
  • Census 1861: 28 Houses; Inhabitants 135
  • Census 1871: 21 Houses; Inhabitants 134
  • Census 1881: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 108
GARDRUM
Gea’rr-bhaili’: The short drumlin. OSNB; TNCT; Gargrome (1609), (1610); Gargroome (1654); Gargrum (1666);Killycahan : Coill Ui’ Cathain- the wood of O’Cahan or O’Kane, :Fairview” was the name of the house that stood here near the trees before it was razed, when St. John’s Secondary School was built on the site. From here there was a fine view of the monthly fair at the Commons or Fair Green, beside the bridge to Dromore. Dromore Presbyterian Church is in this townland.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 16; Inhabitants 77; Arable acres 128; bog 10
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 16 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 82
  • Census 1851: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 56
  • Census 1861: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 48
  • Census 1871: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 45
  • Census 1881: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 52
GLENGREEN
Gleann caoin: The pleasant glen; but “Gleann gaoine, chosen glen or glen of goodness”, OSNB; TNCT; Glangine (1609, 1610); Eshydooey Ais a’ drumhaidh: the hillside of the burial-mound; “The Stayney”, from the Irish, staonadh: the incline place (between W. Corrigan’s land and Lattimore’s). “Barrawalk”, from Barr a’ bhaic: top of the hollow (beside McKeogh’s, former homes of, Morris, McSorley, McLaughlin families). Mullaghmenn (Mullach min): the even hilltop.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 1 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 38; Inhabitants 183; Arable acres 186; Mountain 200; bog 70
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 36 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 55 Houses; Inhabitants 314
  • Census 1851: 45 Houses; Inhabitants 251
  • Census 1861: 44 Houses; Inhabitants 224
  • Census 1871: 39 Houses; Inhabitants 189
  • Census 1881: 31 Houses; Inhabitants 161
GOLAND
Gabhla’n: The wee fork (of the river). OSNB; “Gabhal-a’n: fort or fork shaped portion of land”, TNCT; Gouland (1654); Goland (1666); Goland Upper & Goland Lower OSM-1834;
Goland Upper OSM-1834: Houses 8; Inhabitants 39; Arable acres 60; bog 15
Goland Lower OSM-1834: Houses 5; Inhabitants 33; Arable acres 54; bog 10
Goland (total)
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths (Mullaghban & Goland were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 13; Inhabitants 72; Arable acres 114; bog 25
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 19 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 25 Houses; Inhabitants 152
  • Census 1851: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 71
  • Census 1861: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 66
  • Census 1871: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 41
  • Census 1881: 6 Houses; Inhabitants 30
GRENNAN
Greana’n: The wee, sandy (or gravelly) place. “Griana’n, solarium. A fort, a royal place”, OSNB; “A sunny situation”, TNCT; Crockahock Cross is the start of the road to Grennan Glen. The name may be Cnoc a’ thoicht, the hill of the grief.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths Hearths (Grennan & Dressogue were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 18; Inhabitants 124; Arable acres 200; Mountain 300; bog 70
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 17 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 27 Houses; Inhabitants 172
  • Census 1851: 25 Houses; Inhabitants 177
  • Census 1861: 28 Houses; Inhabitants 156
  • Census 1871: 25 Houses; Inhabitants 134
  • Census 1881: 22 Houses; Inhabitants 106
KIELDRUM
Caol Druim: The narrow hill-ridge. “Coill droma, wood of the ridge”, OSNB; TNCT; Keildrum (1609); Kildrum (1654); Keeldrum (1666); Church Hill, on the south of this townland, is the site of an early church of St. Coinneach, marked on the map of 1609.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths (Cranny & Kieldrum were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 14; Inhabitants 105; Arable acres 150; bog 90
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 52 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 20 Houses; Inhabitants 142
  • Census 1851: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 120
  • Census 1861: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 98
  • Census 1871: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 89
  • Census 1881: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 98
KNOCKARAVEN
Cnoc a’ fhraobha’in: Bilberry hill. “Cnock a’ riabha’in, Reaven’s hill”, OSNB; “Raven’s Hill”, TNCT; Knockraven (1834); Knockaravan OSM-1834; The Hollow: the neighbourhood of McNulty’s farm. The Island: field on McNulty’s farm.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 10; Inhabitants 57; Arable acres 72; bog 15
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 28 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 40 Houses; Inhabitants 211
  • Census 1851: 28 Houses; Inhabitants 129
  • Census 1861: 27 Houses; Inhabitants 122
  • Census 1871: 21 Houses; Inhabitants 122
  • Census 1881: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 89
KNOCKNAHORN
Cnoc na heornan: Barley hill. OSNB; TNCT; This hill is still pointed out on Patrick Teague’s land. This townland was part of Corbally and called ‘Corbally Fergus’, the remainder being named ‘Corbally Conn’. Conn and Fergus were McCusker brothers, who held these lands from the 1700s, when they feature in documents in the Registry of Deeds, Dublin (Volumes: 239, p. 151; 524, p.341).
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: There is no ‘Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland’ data for this townland, as it was part of Corbally in 1834. The OSM-1834 data for Corbally includes data for this townland. Knockknahorn does first appear on the 1841 Census data, and is on the 1864 Griffith’s Valuation. When searching the 1834 Tithe Applotment for sunames from Knocknahorn, look under Corbally.
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: Under Corbally, agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 45 Houses; Inhabitants 247
  • Census 1851: 27 Houses; Inhabitants 143
  • Census 1861: 34 Houses; Inhabitants 205
  • Census 1871: 36 Houses; Inhabitants 144
  • Census 1881: 21 Houses; Inhabitants 118
LETTEREE
Leitir Aoidh: Hugh’s hillside. “Litir righ, the hill of the king”, OSNB; “Wet or spewy hillside”, TNCT; Letter E (1609); Lettery (1610); Letry (1666); Letteree (1834), OSM-1834;
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths (Dullaghan & Letteree were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 20; Inhabitants 107; Arable acres 112; Mountain 180; bog 40
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 19 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 32 Houses; Inhabitants 208
  • Census 1851: 30 Houses; Inhabitants 179
  • Census 1861: 29 Houses; Inhabitants 167
  • Census 1871: 27 Houses; Inhabitants 164
  • Census 1881: 25 Houses; Inhabitants 140
LISANEDEN
Lios an e’adain: Fort of the hillface. Translated a “fort of the forehead”, OSNB; “fort of the hillbrow”, TNCT; Lissoneadon (1654); Lisenedan (1666); Lisneaden (1834); Lisenadin OSM-1834; “Mollywee” Mala bhui: the yellos or sunny hillbrow, name of a field on the Pearson property.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 1 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 19; Inhabitants 121; Arable acres 156; bog 30
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 15 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 20 Houses; Inhabitants 118
  • Census 1851: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 101
  • Census 1861: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 58
  • Census 1871: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 52
  • Census 1881: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 45
LETTERGESH
Leitir gaiseach: The streamy hillside. “Litir gaise, hill of the torents”, OSNB; TNCT; Lettergesse (1609, 1610); Lettergesh (1654); Lettergash (1834);
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 9; Inhabitants 62; Arable acres 84; Mountain 30; bog 60 (The accuracy of this entry is in question. The 1841-81 census states it has a total of 613 standard acres or 378 Irish acres. The OSM-1834 total is 174 Irish acres. This puts the population data in question.)
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 32 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 51 Houses; Inhabitants 280
  • Census 1851: 36 Houses; Inhabitants 198
  • Census 1861: 29 Houses; Inhabitants 163
  • Census 1871: 23 Houses; Inhabitants 128
  • Census 1881: 21 Houses; Inhabitants 139
LONGHILL
Leamhchoill: Elmwood, OSNB; TNCT; B. Oghill (1609); Ballioghill (1610); Long Hill (1834); Oughill OSM-1934; “Oghill” seems to suggest Irish, “Eochaill”, a yew-wood.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 17; Inhabitants 74; Arable acres 48; bog 10
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 3 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 6 Houses; Inhabitants 33
  • Census 1851: 4 Houses; Inhabitants 24
  • Census 1861: 3 Houses; Inhabitants 12
  • Census 1871: 3 Houses; Inhabitants 14
  • Census 1881: 2 Houses; Inhabitants 11
MAGHERAGART
Machaire (na) cea’edcha: Plain of the forge or smithy. :”Machaire gart, famous plain”, OSNB; TNCT; Mugacart (1609, 1610); Magort (1654); Mahergart (1834); Mahagart OSM-1934; The O.S. maps mark three townlands under this name: Magheragart, the northernmost (L, 5,6,9) containing “Belleisle”, marked on the map as Mick McGrath’s place, although this name only dates from the last (19th) century. It is not to be found in the lease of April 14, 1727, from Henry Mervyn to Guy Carleton of Rossfad, Fermanagh, who received permission from Mervyn “to build a new mill or mills on the land of Mahagart….” (Registry of deeds, Dublin: vol. 54, p.274). This old mill, not marked on today’s O.S.map, was also on McGrath’s land, where the “Shelling Hill” is still pointed out. The second is Magheragart Donnell. The trird townland of the name is marked on the O.S. map, (L,5,6) as “Magheragart or Sessiaghs”, and adjoins the other two, to the east. Sessiags is the englished form of “Seisi’och”, a sixth, an old Irish land measurement. It contains the “Middle Island”, “Small Island”, and “Sessiaghs Hill”, which is on Michael Donaghey’s property.
Total OSM-1834: Houses 36; Inhabitants 175; Arable acres 264 and 1/2; bog 40. (In the OSM-1834 the townland is under one name. It is listed under the three names given above in the 1834 Tithe Applotment and the subsequent Censuses.)
Magheragart
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths (Magheragart & Mullaghnagoagh (Mulnagoagh) were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 6 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 65
  • Census 1851: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 37
  • Census 1861: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 51
  • Census 1871: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 48
  • Census 1881: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 44

Magheragart Donnell
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 20 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 20 Houses; Inhabitants 101
  • Census 1851: 17 Houses; Inhabitants 109
  • Census 1861: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 68
  • Census 1871: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 76
  • Census 1881: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 61

Magheragart or Sessiaghs
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 9 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 53
  • Census 1851: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 58
  • Census 1861: 12 Houses; Inhabitants 49
  • Census 1871: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 50
  • Census 1881: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 31

MEENAGOWAN
Min a’ ghabhann: The smith’s smooth filed. OSNB; TNCT; Minigoan (1834); Minigone OSM-1834;
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 12; Inhabitants 77; Arable acres 119; bog 30
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 15 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 19 Houses; Inhabitants 86
  • Census 1851: 19 Houses; Inhabitants 98
  • Census 1861: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 78
  • Census 1871: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 60
  • Census 1881: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 48
MINNEGAR
Muineach gea’rr: Short hill or short thicket. “Mine gea’rr, short field”, OSNB; TNCT; Minigare (1609), Meeneger (1654); Minigar (1834); “The burnt school”: site of school, burned down, sometime at the end of the last (19th) century (on Owen Slevin’s land).
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 9; Inhabitants 62; Arable acres 84; Mountain 30; bog 60
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 26 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 41 Houses; Inhabitants 224
  • Census 1851: 34 Houses; Inhabitants 170
  • Census 1861: 35 Houses; Inhabitants 184
  • Census 1871: 34 Houses; Inhabitants 180
  • Census 1881: 32 Houses; Inhabitants 156
MULLAGHBANE
Mullach ba’n: The fair (or white) hilltop. “White summit”, OSNB; TNCT; Mullahbine (1654); Mullaghban (1666, 1834); Lisnagardy (Lios na gcorr dubh: fort of the black edges), a ring-fort, now gone, on Eamonn Colton’s land. Caldragh (Cealtrach: churchyard), Disused graveyard on Andrew’s property, site of a church of Canons Regular of St. Augustine.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths (Mullaghban & Goland were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 34; Inhabitants 218; Arable acres 324; Mountain 10; bog 120
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: Not listed, agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 36 Houses; Inhabitants 207
  • Census 1851: 28 Houses; Inhabitants 176
  • Census 1861: 27 Houses; Inhabitants 138
  • Census 1871: 23 Houses; Inhabitants 118
  • Census 1881: 23 Houses; Inhabitants 102
MULLANBOY
Muineall bui’: The yellow nect (of land). “Mullan bui’, yellow hill”, OSNB; “yellow summit”, TNCT; Monnell beg (1654); Munal boy (1666); Mullenbuy OSM-1934;
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 9; Inhabitants 65; Arable acres 105; bog 40
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 26 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 76
  • Census 1851: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 55
  • Census 1861: 12 Houses; Inhabitants 62
  • Census 1871: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 68
  • Census 1881: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 49
MULNAGOAGH
Mullach na gcuach: The hilltop of the cuckoos. OSNB; TNCT; Molanagough (1609); Mollangough (1610); Mollenagogh (1654); Mullaghnagoagh (1666); Mullinagough (1834); Mulnagoe OSM-1834; “Sleephill” is a field in the north of the townland, belonging to Edward Teague, formerly Edward Montague’s.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths (Magheragart & Mullaghnagoagh (Mulnagoagh) were recorded together, as a “walk”, see note above.)
  • OSM-1834: Houses 14; Inhabitants 69; Arable acres 120; bog 6
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 15 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 19 Houses; Inhabitants 89
  • Census 1851: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 65
  • Census 1861: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 41
  • Census 1871: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 44
  • Census 1881: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 28
NEWPARK
This is the only townland with an English name in the parish, although the word, “park” is really the Irish word, “pa’ic”, a field. Our first reference to it is a deed of Oct. q9, 1764, where it is refered to as “Derganah otherwise Newpark”, which gave the impression that Newpark was originally part of Dergany (Registry of Deeds, Dublin: Vol. 240, p.18). Lord Belmore lists these lands as belonging to his ancestors in 1777, where he mentions a list of rents from various places here. Right after “Galbolly”, on the next line is “Do. The Parck” (Belmore, Two Ulster Manors, 342). From this it would seem that Newpark was formerly part of Galbally townland.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 19; Inhabitants 104; Arable acres 170; bog 20
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 18 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 33 Houses; Inhabitants 202
  • Census 1851: 21 Houses; Inhabitants 132
  • Census 1861: 21 Houses; Inhabitants 100
  • Census 1871: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 75
  • Census 1881: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 75
OUGHTERARD
Uachtar ard: The upper height. TNCT; Translated as “high, upper part”, OSNB; Waghterard (1654); Oitterard (1654); Knockanenny Cnoc an aonaigh: the hill of the fair, on Edmond Slevin’s lanf. Tannagh Tamhnach: the fair, watered land. It extended from McAleer’s to the Yellow lane.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 22; Inhabitants 160; Arable acres 180; bog 30
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 19 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 33 Houses; Inhabitants 185
  • Census 1851: 25 Houses; Inhabitants 156
  • Census 1861: 24 Houses; Inhabitants 120
  • Census 1871: 20 Houses; Inhabitants 85
  • Census 1881: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 84
POLFORE
Poll fuar: The cold hollow, “Could hole or pit”, OSNB; TNCT; Tullawan Tulach bhan: the white hill, marked as “Tullybane” is in the very south of the townland (O.S. Tyr., L, 6). Crontully Cruinn-tulach: the circular hill, is in the very north of the townland. Black Hill is just east of Aughlish Bridge, where the McCrystal bungalows are situated. Polfore hill is the next hill to the east of the latter. Polfore and Aughlish townlands are marked on the Down Survey Map of 1657 under the common name, Edergould, (Eadarghabha’il: between the river forks), and this was all churchland then. The name, Edergould, confused writers like Belmore The Irish Historical Atlas (p60), who identified it with another Edergould, north of here, near Omagh.
  •  Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 25; Inhabitants 143; Arable acres 161; bog 40
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 27 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 32 Houses; Inhabitants 190
  • Census 1851: 30 Houses; Inhabitants 155
  • Census 1861: 29 Houses; Inhabitants 129
  • Census 1871: 23 Houses; Inhabitants 105
  • Census 1881: 22 Houses; Inhabitants 83
RAHONEY
Rath an eanaigh: Fort ot the marsh, This fort, on a hill on McQuaid’s farm, has a marsh below the hill. “Rath chonaidh: fort of the firewood”, OSNB; TNCT; Rahownagh (1609), Rahannagh (1610); Rahanagh (1654); Rahawnagh (1666); Raveny (1834); Rahawney OSM-1934; Clatty Hill (Cnoc na gcleiti’: Hill of the feathers or plumes). Roskey Riascach: marshy Place. The Togher To’char: a pass through a wet place or bog. This is the name of a part of the road between the residences of P. McAloon, and McAloon’s Cross. Vinegar Hill Fiobb-chor: the fair round hill, is a common name for many a hill in Ireland.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 34; Inhabitants 222; Arable acres 402; bog 60
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 40 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 46 Houses; Inhabitants 272
  • Census 1851: 26 Houses; Inhabitants 151
  • Census 1861: 24 Houses; Inhabitants 119
  • Census 1871: 19 Houses; Inhabitants 112
  • Census 1881: 17 Houses; Inhabitants 100
RAKEERANBEG
Rath a’ chaorthainn bheag: Fort of the wee rowantree. There is no sigh of a fort here today, but one is mentioned here in the 1830’s. TNCT, translated as: “Rath of the little quicken tree grove”. But, “Rath Chiara’in bheag, Ciaran’s little fort”, OSNB; Rathkerkinn (1609); Tathkirhin (1610); Ragerran beg (1654); Rikirran (1666); Rakearnbeg (1834); Rakerenbeg OSM-1834;  Milltown: Place where an old mill stood beside James Smith’s.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 4; Inhabitants 40; Arable acres 65; bog 9
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 6 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 57
  • Census 1851: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 53
  • Census 1861: 8 Houses; Inhabitants 37
  • Census 1871: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 52
  • Census 1881: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 48
SHANERAGH
Sean fhe’arach: The old grazing place. “Sean rath, or fort”, OSNB; TNCT; Shanieragh (1610); Shaneferagh (1654); Shanferagh (1666); Shannera (1733); Shanerah R. & Shanerah W. OSM-1834;
Shanerah R. OSM-1834: Houses 33; Inhabitants 175; Arable acres 230; bog 110
Shanerah W. OSM-1834: Houses 31; Inhabitants 167; Arable acres 211; bog 110
Shanerah (total)
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 64; Inhabitants 342; Arable acres 441; bog 220
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: Not listed, agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 75 Houses; Inhabitants 458
  • Census 1851: 58 Houses; Inhabitants 331
  • Census 1861: 55 Houses; Inhabitants 282
  • Census 1871: 49 Houses; Inhabitants 245
  • Census 1881: 39 Houses; Inhabitants 204
SHANMULLAGH
Sean mhullach: The old hilltop. OSNB; TNCT; Shannuellagh (1610); Shane Mullagh (1654); Shanmulla (1834); Shanmullagh Glebe 1841-81 census;
  •  Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 8; Inhabitants 43; Arable acres 70; bog 8
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 9 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 46
  • Census 1851: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 57
  • Census 1861: 12 Houses; Inhabitants 56
  • Census 1871: 13 Houses; Inhabitants 86
  • Census 1881: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 50
SKEOGUE
Sciacho’g: The whitethorn. “Sciatho’g, a lone thorn (bush)”, OSNB; TNCT; Sceogue (1834); Skeages OSM-1834;
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 15; Inhabitants 104; Arable acres 188; mountain 170, bog 40
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 14 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 110
  • Census 1851: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 99
  • Census 1861: 12 Houses; Inhabitants 77
  • Census 1871: 14 Houses; Inhabitants 74
  • Census 1881: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 78
STRADUFF
Srath dubh: The black river-holm. “Black holm”, OSNB; TNCT; Shraghduffe (1654); Straduff (1834);
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 14; Inhabitants 80; Arable acres 94; mountain 10, bog 100
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 14 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 97
  • Census 1851: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 51
  • Census 1861: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 56
  • Census 1871: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 46
  • Census 1881: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 43
TATTYCOR
Tulach claonach: The inclined hill. “Tullaigh cluana, hill of the lawn or meadow”, OSNB; TNCT; Colclinaght (1666); Tullecleenagh (1732); Tullyclunack (1834); Tatticor OSM-1834;
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 2 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 25; Inhabitants 156; Arable acres 132; bog 35
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 19 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 37 Houses; Inhabitants 204
  • Census 1851: 31 Houses; Inhabitants 137
  • Census 1861: 17 Houses; Inhabitants 76
  • Census 1871: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 69
  • Census 1881: 12 Houses; Inhabitants 45
TULLYCLUNAGH See note 2 above. Tullyclunagh (1666); Tullyclunah OSM-1834; Tithe Applotment of 1834, listed under Tullyclunagh Slevin and Tullyclunagh Warnack.
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 1 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 10; Inhabitants 80; Arable acres 118; bog 14
  • Tithe Applotment 1834 Tullyclunagh Slevin : 7 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Tithe Applotment 1834 Tullyclunagh Warnack : 3 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Total Tithe Applotment 1834: 10 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 17 Houses; Inhabitants 100
  • Census 1851: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 93
  • Census 1861: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 88
  • Census 1871: 16 Houses; Inhabitants 70
  • Census 1881: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 61
TULLYMAGOUGH
Tulach mhic Eochadha: The hill of the son of Eochadh (or the hill of McKeogh). “Magough’s Hill”. OSNB; “Keogh’s hill”, TNCT; Tullymagough (1834); 
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Not listed
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 1 tax payers/Hearths
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 16 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 18 Houses; Inhabitants 87
  • Census 1851: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 49
  • Census 1861: 11 Houses; Inhabitants 60
  • Census 1871: 6 Houses; Inhabitants 42
  • Census 1881: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 40
TULLTWEE
Tulach bhui’: The yellow (or sunny) hill. OSNB; TNCT; Tullawee )1834); Tullywee OSM-1834;
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 0 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 30; Inhabitants 169; Arable acres 122; bog 20
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 11 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 15 Houses; Inhabitants 85
  • Census 1851: 10 Houses; Inhabitants 45
  • Census 1861: 7 Houses; Inhabitants 40
  • Census 1871: 9 Houses; Inhabitants 40
  • Census 1881: 5 Houses; Inhabitants 31
TUMMERY
An t-Iomaire: The ridge. OSNB; TNCT; Possibly a boundary ridge. Oldtimers pronounce it as “Chimmery”. Timory (1609, 1654); Tumory (1666); Tummery (1834);  The eastern part of this townland was known as “Tummery Teague” and the western part, “Tummery Gallagher”. Other names know here are, Drumbrack (Druim breac): the speckled drumlin, and Barnatomog (Ba’rr na dtomo’g): top of the bushes. “The Long Shot” is the name of a field on James O’Neill’s land.
Tummery Teague OSM-1834: Houses 37; Inhabitants 164; Arable acres 210; bog 30
Tummery Gallagher OSM-1834: Houses 35; Inhabitants 210; Arable acres 227; bog 50
Tummery (total)
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 3 tax payers/Hearths
  • OSM-1834: Houses 72; Inhabitants 374; Arable acres 437; bog 80
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 66 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 87 Houses; Inhabitants 479
  • Census 1851: 73 Houses; Inhabitants 329
  • Census 1861: 74 Houses; Inhabitants 343
  • Census 1871: 61 Houses; Inhabitants 315
  • Census 1881: 47 Houses; Inhabitants 264
Total Parish of Dromore
  • Hearth Tax 1666: 58 tax payers
  • OSM-1834: Houses 1,044; Inhabitants 8,120; Arable acres 10,298; mountain 1,741, bog 2,928
  • Tithe Applotment 1834: 1,285 agricultural holdings over one acre
  • Census 1841: 1,874 Houses; Inhabitants 10,601
  • Census 1851: 1,471 Houses; Inhabitants 8,091
  • Census 1861: 1,432 Houses; Inhabitants 7,190
  • Census 1871: 1,271 Houses; Inhabitants 6,508
  • Census 1881: 1,124 Houses; Inhabitants 5,878

















































































































































































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